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ASU nursing student practicing in the High-Fidelity Simulation LabASU nursing student practicing in the High-Fidelity Simulation LabASU is ranked No. 20 in the U.S. and is one of nine Texas schools to make the rankings. To be eligible, schools must be designated a Hispanic Serving Institution by the U.S. Department of Education and offer accredited nursing degree programs. The eligible schools were then ranked based on cost of attendance, rankings in U.S. News and World Report, student reviews and alumni salaries. Data for the rankings came from the National Center for Education Statistics, College Scorecard, Niche, and U.S. News and World Report.

ASU has been designated a Hispanic Serving Institution since 2010. To achieve the HSI designation, an institution’s Hispanic enrollment must exceed 25 percent of its undergraduate student population. For the 2018-19 academic year, ASU’s undergraduate Hispanic enrollment reached 36 percent.

The ASU Department of Nursing offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) for undergraduate students and an online Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) with two different specialization options for graduate nurses. M.S.N. students can choose between a Family Nurse Practitioner option and a Nurse Educator option.

On a related note, Angelo State’s M.S.N.-Nurse Educator degree program has been ranked No. 9 in the U.S. among the “Top 20 Online Nursing Education Master’s Degrees” for 2019-20 by the TopEducationDegrees.org higher education resource guide.

ASU is one of five Texas schools with nursing programs on the list – and ranked second among the Texas schools behind only the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Only accredited nursing programs were eligible for the rankings, which were also based on cost of attendance, student-to-faculty ratio, and rankings in U.S. News and World Report.

All of ASU’s online and on-campus B.S.N. and M.S.N. degree programs are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and approved by the Texas Board of Nursing. More details are available at www.angelo.edu/nursing.

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4 October 2019

Visit PBN, GuestPost or Syndication for Backlink Building for the whole story Backlink Building We can spend all day optimizing our pages for keywords that we researched for days and never rank content on Google Search.  Its just the cold hard fact that in SEO onpage optimization is the easiest thing and it used to work in the 1990s … heck back then you could keyword stuff […] The post PBN, GuestPost or Syndication for Backlink Building appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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21 September 2019

Visit New Google Backlink Types And SEO Value Of NoFollow Links Changes for the whole story Two things are important for you to take away from this post and they are listed right below.  We’ve then included Google content explaining these two changes in backlinks.  If the text is italic and navy blue, its quoted from Google. User Generated Content or Sponsored Backlinks Added Are two additional rel=”” tag options introduced […] The post New Google Backlink Types And SEO Value Of NoFollow Links Changes appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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14 September 2019

Visit Sex, Speed And The SEO Migration of Romantic Depot to WordPress for the whole story Romantic Depot operates six, soon to be seven adult stores offering sex toys and lingerie, in the New York City area.  Their flagship stores are in Manhattan and the Bronx.  They’ve been around for sometime and over the years their website aged along with other businesses seeking to help drive local foot traffic. With the move to mobile devices in full […] The post Sex, Speed And The SEO Migration of Romantic Depot to WordPress appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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8 September 2019

Visit Managing And Maintaining A PBN for the whole story PBNs in 2019 can be just as effective as they once were if properly maintained and staged.  Mimicing an organic site goes a long way in the stability of your PBN. Additional Private Blog Network Resources: SEO PBN – Collection of all our SEO Articles on PBNs PBN Videos For Finding Expired Domains Backlinks and […] The post Managing And Maintaining A PBN appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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5 September 2019

Visit Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late for the whole story Adobe Will No Longer Support Flash After 2020, 10 Years After Steve Jobs Argued Why It Should End In 2010. Google Announced in September 2019 that it was phasing out support for Flash from its Chrome browser following Adobe;s announcement that they would end support in 2020.  Apple users wont likely hear much about the […] The post Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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25 August 2019

Visit Custom SEO Site Audit for the whole story Example Audit Considerations This post includes a client audit recently completed with the client’s name largely removed.  Some reports are linked too from within the report and since those reports are still of use to the client they remain largely intact. This has prevented redaction of these external reports. Graphics may include the client’s site […] The post Custom SEO Site Audit appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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11 August 2019

Visit WordPress SEO Security Settings For WP Cerber for the whole story One might think cybersecurity is not an SEO topic, but it is a very important SEO topic.  SEO as I keep noting here is more than keywords today. Technical SEO is about speed optimization, files such as robots.txt and sitemap.xml and security of your site IS an SEO matter. If you neglect your security Google […] The post WordPress SEO Security Settings For WP Cerber appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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29 July 2019

Visit SEO PBN for the whole story Private Blog Networks or PBNs have a vilified reputation of being “black hat SEO” but this is a poor way of looking at an SEO tool still used by many just by other names. Hits: 168 The post SEO PBN appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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20 July 2019

Visit Link Building: Redirecting Expired Domains Backlinks for the whole story Link building is one of the harder  aspects of SEO and because of this one of the least done. Unfortunately it is many times more powerful than anything you do to your page and content.  No level of optimization of content will trump the power of well placed relevant backlinks. Its so hard few ever […] The post Link Building: Redirecting Expired Domains Backlinks appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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18 July 2019

Visit Duplicate Content Kills Your SEO for the whole story Duplicate content is a threat to your SEO rankings but not in the way you think.  It is distracting you from stuff that actually matters.  Google has no penalty and notes much of the web is duplicate content, the question is whether your use of the content ads value. Google noted over ten years ago […] The post Duplicate Content Kills Your SEO appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks – Forums, FAQs & Guides. …

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Google Announced in September 2019 that it was phasing out support for Flash from its Chrome browser following Adobe;s announcement that they would end support in 2020.  Apple users wont likely hear much about the end of Flash, in 2010,  Steve Jobs wrote a scathing review of Flash and in it explained why Apple products wouldn’t support it.

Google’s Flash Announcement:

For 20 years, Flash has helped shape the way that you play games, watch videos and run applications on the web. But over the last few years, Flash has become less common. Three years ago, 80 percent of desktop Chrome users visited a site with Flash each day. Today usage is only 17 percent and continues to decline.

This trend reveals that sites are migrating to open web technologies, which are faster and more power-efficient than Flash. They’re also more secure, so you can be safer while shopping, banking, or reading sensitive documents. They also work on both mobile and desktop, so you can visit your favorite site anywhere.

These open web technologies became the default experience for Chrome late last year when sites started needing to ask your permission to run Flash. Chrome will continue phasing out Flash over the next few years, first by asking for your permission to run Flash in more situations, and eventually disabling it by default. We will remove Flash completely from Chrome toward the end of 2020.

If you regularly visit a site that uses Flash today, you may be wondering how this affects you. If the site migrates to open web standards, you shouldn’t notice much difference except that you’ll no longer see prompts to run Flash on that site. If the site continues to use Flash, and you give the site permission to run Flash, it will work through the end of 2020.

It’s taken a lot of close work with Adobe, other browsers, and major publishers to make sure the web is ready to be Flash-free. We’re supportive of Adobe’s announcement today, and we look forward to working with everyone to make the web even better.

Steve Job’s Adobe Flash Note:

Apple has a long relationship with Adobe. In fact, we met Adobe’s founders when they were in their proverbial garage. Apple was their first big customer, adopting their Postscript language for our new Laserwriter printer. Apple invested in Adobe and owned around 20% of the company for many years. The two companies worked closely together to pioneer desktop publishing and there were many good times. Since that golden era, the companies have grown apart. Apple went through its near death experience, and Adobe was drawn to the corporate market with their Acrobat products. Today the two companies still work together to serve their joint creative customers – Mac users buy around half of Adobe’s Creative Suite products – but beyond that there are few joint interests.

I wanted to jot down some of our thoughts on Adobe’s Flash products so that customers and critics may better understand why we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven – they say we want to protect our App Store – but in reality it is based on technology issues. Adobe claims that we are a closed system, and that Flash is open, but in fact the opposite is true. Let me explain.

First, there’s “Open”.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple has many proprietary products too. Though the operating system for the iPhone, iPod and iPad is proprietary, we strongly believe that all standards pertaining to the web should be open. Rather than use Flash, Apple has adopted HTML5, CSS and JavaScript – all open standards. Apple’s mobile devices all ship with high performance, low power implementations of these open standards. HTML5, the new web standard that has been adopted by Apple, Google and many others, lets web developers create advanced graphics, typography, animations and transitions without relying on third party browser plug-ins (like Flash). HTML5 is completely open and controlled by a standards committee, of which Apple is a member.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

Second, there’s the “full web”.

Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access “the full web” because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don’t say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web’s video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others. iPhone, iPod and iPad users aren’t missing much video.

Another Adobe claim is that Apple devices cannot play Flash games. This is true. Fortunately, there are over 50,000 games and entertainment titles on the App Store, and many of them are free. There are more games and entertainment titles available for iPhone, iPod and iPad than for any other platform in the world.

Third, there’s reliability, security and performance.

Symantec recently highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009. We also know first hand that Flash is the number one reason Macs crash. We have been working with Adobe to fix these problems, but they have persisted for several years now. We don’t want to reduce the reliability and security of our iPhones, iPods and iPads by adding Flash.

In addition, Flash has not performed well on mobile devices. We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now. We have never seen it. Adobe publicly said that Flash would ship on a smartphone in early 2009, then the second half of 2009, then the first half of 2010, and now they say the second half of 2010. We think it will eventually ship, but we’re glad we didn’t hold our breath. Who knows how it will perform?

Fourth, there’s battery life.

To achieve long battery life when playing video, mobile devices must decode the video in hardware; decoding it in software uses too much power. Many of the chips used in modern mobile devices contain a decoder called H.264 – an industry standard that is used in every Blu-ray DVD player and has been adopted by Apple, Google (YouTube), Vimeo, Netflix and many other companies.

Although Flash has recently added support for H.264, the video on almost all Flash websites currently requires an older generation decoder that is not implemented in mobile chips and must be run in software. The difference is striking: on an iPhone, for example, H.264 videos play for up to 10 hours, while videos decoded in software play for less than 5 hours before the battery is fully drained.

When websites re-encode their videos using H.264, they can offer them without using Flash at all. They play perfectly in browsers like Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome without any plugins whatsoever, and look great on iPhones, iPods and iPads.

Fifth, there’s Touch.

Flash was designed for PCs using mice, not for touch screens using fingers. For example, many Flash websites rely on “rollovers”, which pop up menus or other elements when the mouse arrow hovers over a specific spot. Apple’s revolutionary multi-touch interface doesn’t use a mouse, and there is no concept of a rollover. Most Flash websites will need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices. If developers need to rewrite their Flash websites, why not use modern technologies like HTML5, CSS and JavaScript?

Even if iPhones, iPods and iPads ran Flash, it would not solve the problem that most Flash websites need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices.

Sixth, the most important reason.

Besides the fact that Flash is closed and proprietary, has major technical drawbacks, and doesn’t support touch based devices, there is an even more important reason we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. We have discussed the downsides of using Flash to play video and interactive content from websites, but Adobe also wants developers to adopt Flash to create apps that run on our mobile devices.

We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.

This becomes even worse if the third party is supplying a cross platform development tool. The third party may not adopt enhancements from one platform unless they are available on all of their supported platforms. Hence developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features. Again, we cannot accept an outcome where developers are blocked from using our innovations and enhancements because they are not available on our competitor’s platforms.

Flash is a cross platform development tool. It is not Adobe’s goal to help developers write the best iPhone, iPod and iPad apps. It is their goal to help developers write cross platform apps. And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple’s platforms. For example, although Mac OS X has been shipping for almost 10 years now, Adobe just adopted it fully (Cocoa) two weeks ago when they shipped CS5. Adobe was the last major third party developer to fully adopt Mac OS X.

Our motivation is simple – we want to provide the most advanced and innovative platform to our developers, and we want them to stand directly on the shoulders of this platform and create the best apps the world has ever seen. We want to continually enhance the platform so developers can create even more amazing, powerful, fun and useful applications. Everyone wins – we sell more devices because we have the best apps, developers reach a wider and wider audience and customer base, and users are continually delighted by the best and broadest selection of apps on any platform.

Conclusions.

Flash was created during the PC era – for PCs and mice. Flash is a successful business for Adobe, and we can understand why they want to push it beyond PCs. But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards – all areas where Flash falls short.

The avalanche of media outlets offering their content for Apple’s mobile devices demonstrates that Flash is no longer necessary to watch video or consume any kind of web content. And the 250,000 apps on Apple’s App Store proves that Flash isn’t necessary for tens of thousands of developers to create graphically rich applications, including games.

New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too). Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind.

Steve Jobs
April, 2010

What This Means In SEO

If your site uses Flash, you have a year to stop or no one will see your site content unless they uses an older version of a browser that still plays Flash.

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Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late

Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late

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Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late

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Adobe announced the end of Flash, a technology that ended for many in 2010.

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The FREP is funded through multiple university resources and supports meritorious research undertaken by faculty members in all academic disciplines. The 2019-20 grants have been awarded to faculty undertaking six research projects, including:

Dr. Heather BradenDr. Heather BradenHeather Braden, professor of physical therapy, was awarded $15,000 for her project titled “Does slow mean steady? Characteristics of sit to stand then walk versus sit to walk for the elderly.” She will investigate the internal characteristics of sit to stand, such as velocity, force and impulse. Understanding these basic mechanisms can help practitioners identify and ultimately mitigate the impact of adverse events, such as falls, among the elderly.

Dr. Edith OsborneDr. Edith OsborneEdith Osborne, professor of chemistry, was awarded $15,000 for her project titled “Identification of affibody molecules that target Crotalid snake venoms.” Although effective anti-venoms for pit viper snakebites exist, they have a variety of limitations and drawbacks. By expanding our knowledge of snake venoms, and specifically of the proteins contained in them, we can potentially create better anti-venoms. Osborne will research methods for analyzing venom proteins in a new way, ultimately helping scientists better understand their interactions.

Dr. Ralph ZehnderDr. Ralph ZehnderRalph Zehnder, associate professor of chemistry, was awarded $15,000 for his project titled “Extending metal organic frameworks towards integration of highly radioactive plutonium and americium.” This continuation of his long-time research will investigate new methods for containing radioactive elements, with the ultimate goal of creating stronger and safer methods for storing nuclear waste. Some of his experiments involve radioactive materials, and those will take place at an off-campus licensed lab.

Dr. Aldo Pinon-VillarrealDr. Aldo Pinon-VillarrealDr. David CarterDr. David CarterAldo Piñon-Villarreal, assistant professor of civil engineering, and Dr. David Carter, assistant professor of chemistry, were awarded $14,983 for their project titled “Use of halophytes grown in zeolite as safe disposal of reverse-osmosis concentrate from desalination plants.” They will investigate whether the use of a soil amendment (zeolite) with a salt-rich R-O concentrate for irrigation of salt-tolerant plants can be a safe disposal method for brackish water waste from desalination plants. They ultimately seek to increase the productivity of arid ecosystems while protecting the soil and groundwater resources.

Dr. Nicole LozanoDr. Nicole LozanoNicole Lozano, assistant professor of psychology, was awarded $14,673 for her project titled “Exploring creativity while being a parent.” Building on existing research that finds engaging in creative activities provides significant health benefits, she will explore how people develop creative practices, particularly after becoming parents, with the aim of learning how parents could be better supported in creative endeavors.

Dr. Drew CurtisDr. Drew CurtisDr. Tay HackDr. Tay HackDrew Curtis, associate professor of psychology, and Dr. Tay Hack, professor of psychology, were awarded $14,133 for their project titled “Investigating internal and external motives for deception.” Their goal is to help identify the theoretical motivations to lie, which could assist organizations and individuals in detecting deception.

To be eligible for FREP funding, faculty must be full-time and have been at ASU at least one year. They prepare full research proposals, which are then reviewed and scored by a panel of their peers. Projects with a high score receive awards based on the availability of funds. Upon completion of their FREP-funded projects, faculty are expected to produce peer-reviewed publications and/or presentations, as well as funding proposals to external agencies to expand their research. The majority of the projects also involve undergraduate and/or graduate students in substantive research activities.

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(L to R) ASU President Brian J. May and SAC President Robert Vela(L to R) ASU President Brian J. May and SAC President Robert VelaSan Antonio College (SAC) and Angelo State University (ASU) in San Angelo want to help students who want to help others. On Friday, Aug. 30, administrators at the two institutions met at SAC to sign a memorandum of understanding to create the Social Work Direct Path program, which will make it easier and more affordable for SAC students studying social work to pursue a bachelor’s degree at ASU.

Currently, SAC offers an associate of arts degree in social work and a new associate of applied science in social work. With the new program, SAC graduates will be able to transfer to ASU and earn a Bachelor of Social Work through an online program. In addition, the students will take one ASU course on the SAC campus.

Dr. Robert Vela, president of SAC, said the agreement opens the door to a new academic opportunity. “We need to ensure that students have options, once they graduate from SAC, to continue their journey and to reach as high as they can,” he said.

Vela added the collaboration with ASU came very naturally. “I think what makes this partnership so special is that we share a lot of the same values. We care about our students,” he said.

Dr. Brian J. May, president of ASU, said that both institutions also share student demographics in common. “We both work really hard with first-generation college students and try to take the extra step to make them successful,” he said.

(L to R) SAC student Amanda Fierro, ASU President Brian J. May, SAC student Shiquera Shannon, SAC...(L to R) SAC student Amanda Fierro, ASU President Brian J. May, SAC student Shiquera Shannon, SAC President Robert VelaPart of that commitment was for ASU to help students graduate with as little or no debt as possible. To that end, ASU will award Carr Transfer Scholarships to students with a 2.5 GPA to help pay for their tuition.

Shiquera Shannon graduated from SAC in 2018, but had difficulty finding a college to pursue a bachelor’s in social work. When she learned about the Social Work Direct Path program, she enrolled. “I wanted something that was simple and affordable and ASU offered that combination. I think it is an awesome opportunity and it was an easy transition,” she said.

When she graduates, Shannon wants to work in the geriatric field, calling it an area that has a great need. “I like making an impact and a difference in someone’s life,” she said.

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